FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health

Why is a Sundae called a Sundae ?

Leave a comment

Try a new category at Food Facts and Fads called “The American Plate.” The posts are a collection of short facts and fads about food in the past and present and contributes to our current American culture. Enjoy!!!

Why are Sundaes Called Sundaes?

The term may have begun in Evanston, Illinois back in 1857  that  had a very pious reputation. Drugstores in many parts of the country were serving very popular ice cream sodas with soda water. However, the soda water was in many religious minds too frivolous or “too sassy” to serve on the Sabbath. So it was banned. Other people were outraged, so one drugstore owner came up with a substitute of putting ice cream in a dish with only chocolate syrup added. Later versions added whipped cream, nuts, and cherries, of course.

The new concoctions were advertised as a Sunday “special” but again, the religious community didn’t approve. So the spelling was changed to Sundi and eventually to Sundae with the approval of the city’s religious zealots. The name stuck and as we know still remains one of the most successful and popular desserts today.

The invention of the ice cream cone came later and is often credited to Ernest Hamwi, who sold zalabia (crisp waffle-like pastry) at the Worlds Fair in St. Louis in 1904.

According to the story, Hamwi’s booth was next to an ice cream vendor, who ran short of dishes. He rolled a waffle into a cone shape to contain the ice cream. The accuracy of this story is unknown, and many others have claimed the invention.  Source: Wikipedia

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s