FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health


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Looking at Lessons from the Blue Zones

 

Check out this 28 minute video that tells us what the author of The Blue Zones found out from his experiences with the longest living people of the world. Some interesting lessons emerge (it’s not so much about food).

CLICK HERE.

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More Glyphosate News?

The news continues to warn about the extensive use of glyphosate. While its carcinogenicity still remains to be determined, there are other health concerns about its extensive use. There are so many questions and biases  about the production and use of the herbicide from both sides of the  issue. Have the research findings been suppressed by the industry? Have they have been altered by the corporations that produce it? That depends on which side one believes. It is extremely hard to find an unbiased opinion about an important topic regarding our food supply.

CLICK HERE.

For more news about Ben & Jerry ice cream, click HERE.


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The Obesity Epidemic: Nature or Nurture?

Fat shaming is found in many aspects of our culture. The obese are described as fat and lazy and looked upon with disdain by even some of the health professionals they seek out to solve many of their health care needs. Perhaps we need to examine the complexities of the interactions that may have contributed to this so-called obesity epidemic to gain a better understanding of what the obese population has to contend with.

In 1960, only 13.4 % of Americans were overweight or obese. By 1990, about 23% were obese, and today, only two decades later, almost 36% are obese. Obesity affects both men and women and all racial and ethnic groups. As far as we know, we still had the same genes and physiology during these decades; however, the food environment or culture had obviously changed.

“The interplay between genetics and lifestyle is often illustrated by the higher incidence of obesity in Pima Indians living in Arizona than in a genetically similar group of Pima Indians living in Mexico. When this genetic susceptibility is combined with an environment that fosters a sedentary lifestyle and consumption of a calorie dense diet, the outcome is the strikingly high incidence of obesity seen in this population. The Pima Indians of Mexico are farmers who work in the fields and consume the food they grow. On the other hand, the Arizona Pima eat the high-calorie, high-fat processed foods,  found in the Standard American Diet (SAD) and lead a more sedentary lifestyle. Both groups have  higher rates of obesity due to their genetic susceptibility; however, the average BMI or the Mexican Pima is significantly lower than that of their American counterparts.” Smolin and Grosvenor, Nutrition: Science and Applications, Third Edition.

Check out my previous post HERE.

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Big Food in Brazil = SAD

Soon all the “healthy” traditional diets of the world will be replaced with ultra-processed “big food” loaded with sugar, fat, and salt. If we think that obesity and chronic disease rates are high now, just wait a few years. It is well known that as the so-called Western diet or Standard American diet (SAD) invades traditional cultures, heart disease rates and obesity increase. This appears to be happening in Brazil according to an article in the NYT. There is a link to the full article in Dr. Nestle’s post. It is a long read, but the bottom line is that the large food companies, like Coca Cola and Nestlé  (no relation to Dr. Marion Nestle) have found new markets and delivery systems in poorer countries. This quote says it all:

‘For some companies, that can mean specifically focusing on young people, as Ahmet Bozer, president of Coca-Cola International, described to investors in 2014. “Half the world’s population has not had a Coke in the last 30 days,” he said. “There’s 600 million teenagers who have not had a Coke in the last week. So the opportunity for that is huge.”

CLICK HERE.


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Chocolate for Breakfast?

If you read between the lines, you can easily see that there is a lot more to eating breakfast or any other meal than just the kind of foods we eat. It appears that some cultures have gotten it right,  e.g. it may be how we eat.  This often is exemplified in the French culture along with their low obesity and heart disease rates. It’s not just the chocolate sprinkles.

CLICK HERE.