FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health


Leave a comment

Sweet Potatoes: Revisited

 

There is so much conflicting  information about carbohydrates  these days. The simple message is: Cut carbs, but wait- all carbohydrates are not equal. An example is easily shown between a comparison of a sweet potato with a white potato, both of which are common starchy vegetable choices.   A previous post shows us why nutrient density can be more important than simply noting just the calories and carbohydrate grams.

CLICK HERE.

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Is Kansas the Future?

 

The following article is a long read but very readable and extremely interesting.  So much of  the time, most of us (me included) do not realize the complexities of where our food comes from or anything about farming. In this article, there is a lot of information the typical farmer these days encounters due to the problems of commodity farming exemplified in the state of Kansas where the socioeconomic environment  has drastically changed in the past few decades.

CLICK HERE.


Leave a comment

A Brief Guide to a Healthy Diet

Having trouble deciding how to improve your diet?  No wonder with all the conflicting and confusing information and misinformation in the media. Relax and begin with this simple advice from Harvard. BTW, no need to try another detox approach.  Bon appétit!!!!

CLICK HERE.

 


Leave a comment

Is Tea Good for the Heart and Brain?

The research on tea and heart disease is often conflicting and inconsistent. However, as we learn more, some answers emerge.  The following article appears to deal with epidemiological aspects of tea drinking and health benifits. As in previous studies, green tea may win out compared to black tea. Also, adding milk or sugar to tea may destroy some of its beneficial  phytonutrients.

CLICK HERE.

What may be good for the heart may be also good for the brain. For a previous post CLICK HERE.

 


Leave a comment

The Flu : A 100 Year-old Lesson?

A Virus

The influenza season is soon to be over for this year; however, it has been a long and relatively severe one.   Perhaps we can learn a lesson from remembering the 19818 flu pandemic.  We had no flu vaccine 100 years ago and as more of us do not get the flu shot during a given year, we could approach that level of morbidity and mortality again – a frightening thought. Many people do not get a flu shot these days and therefore indirectly and unknowingly contribute to this severity.

Part of the problem involves a phenomenon called “herd immunity” and we’re not talking cattle here.  It implies that if enough people in a population are immunized against certain diseases, then it is very difficult for those diseases to spread. For example, when about 90 percent of the population is vaccinated, the spread of the disease is stopped. In other words, the 10% of the herd is susceptible but there are so many vaccinated people there is less chance that the 10% would be exposed to the disease.

Another example: In 2003, measles outbreaks became more prevalent in the UK. Part of the reason was that many parents were not having their children vaccinated with the MMR vaccine due to its alleged association with autism. Later studies failed to support this association; however due to a lack of herd immunity the increased outbreaks occurred.

So next fall when the next flu vaccine (although not perfect)  becomes available, think about a hundred years ago and get a flu shot for the “herd”.

CLICK

 


Leave a comment

Warning About Romaine Lettuce

Just as we have been told by the produce producers that food safety issues from the past have been controlled, another outbreak is occurring across the country.  This time the suspected culprit is romaine lettuce and E.coli 0157:H7 bacteria.  This strain of E. coli 0157:H7  is particularly dangerous due to its association in some cases to a condition called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) which can be fatal or cause lifelong health problems. It is best to avoid romaine entirely at home and in restaurants  since it is difficult to identify the source of this lettuce (presently thought to have been grown in Arizona)

CLICK HERE.


Leave a comment

The Impossible Burger-Still Going Strong?

 

The sales of meatless burgers continues to rise. The Impossible Burger appears to be popular with those who have tried them. The taste of any  type of these meat substitutes will be the key to their acceptance.  Still, food industry continues  to invest in their production.  For a previous post, CLICK HERE.

CLICK HERE