FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health


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The FODMAP Diet: Some Common Sense

 

As with any restrictive diet, caution must be used to avoid nutritional deficiencies.  That is why it is important to pay attention to a registered dietitian when embarking on any diet that restricts certain food groups. If a dietitian is not available, seek out the advice found in the following article from an expert on the FODMAP  diet. The best advice is if this diet approach does not produce any positive results, it may not be for you.

CLICK HERE.

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The Complexities of Food Sensitivities

Most people when confronted with a negative reaction to certain foods simply say “I’m allergic to” (fill in the blank). Self-diagnoses and treatments are common and result in the development of unnecessary restrictive diets and disordered eating.

The following article aptly attempts to wade through  the confusion and complexities of food allergies, intolerances or sensitivities in order to increase some understanding of what to do about these poorly defined and understood afflictions. Even many physicians fail to differentiate the confusion surrounding the problems.  We now have food labels that support a long list of “NO’s) – gluten, wheat, lactose, soy, nuts, high fructose corn syrup, antibiotics, hormones, preservatives, etc. etc.  No wonder people are challenged even when going to the supermarket.

Food allergies can be life-threatening, so it is important to identify which food(s) are the culprits. Keeping a food and symptom diary or beginning an elimination diet with oral challenges should not be attempted without professional help like your physician, physician assistant, or registered dietitan/nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in food intolerances.

The article is a long read, but if you think you may have any food sensitivity, it may be worth the time spent before any self diagnosis or treatment is undertaken. Search this blogsite for information on food alleriges, intolerances, FODMAPs and gluten or wheat intolerance disorders.

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Gluten-Free?

 

The recent gluten-free food fad has some nutritionists concerned. When people eat gluten-free foods, they may be missing some important nutrients. It is generally recommended that if you do not have celiac disease, you do not need to avoid gluten. However, some people have given up wheat and other grains due to a real or perceived benefit. Many report that their digestive symptoms improve or “they just feel better.” Non-celiac gluten sensitivity or gluten intolerance has been suggested but as yet there is no definitive test for its diagnosis.

Research has shown that avoiding FODMAPS can help people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Wheat and other grains (rye, barley) (containing gluten) are sources of fructans that aggravate symptoms of IBS. So it is advised to eliminate these grains for a time from the diet to see if symptoms improve. See a previous post HERE.

If you choose gluten-free foods, you should definitely read the Nutrition Facts Panel as well as the ingredient lists.

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What are the Oligos?

Onion

Onions are a common source of fructans

The FODMAP diet is becoming a common topic on the Internet.  FODMAP means fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and Polyols. Two main components of the FODMAP exist – the fructans or FOS and the galactans or GOS. What are they and what do they have in common?  Why do they cause us problems?  For a previous post, CLICK HERE.

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