FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health


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What’s the Difference Between Organic and Conventional Food?

Organic basil

One of the most common debates among “foodies” is whether you should buy organically produced foods or just stick with conventionally produced food. In my opinion, there is not a whole lot of difference, and it becomes a personal choice when you know the facts.

Bottom Line: Both have their advantages and it is also important when reading about this topic that we recognize the bias promoted by both sides. This article appears to take an independent approach and  may help clear up some misinformation that is needed in order to make informed choices.

There are some concerns. Personally I always felt that organic is better for children due to the differences in pesticide use. Also, the recent debate about the widely used herbicide safety (e.g. Roundup containing glyphosate) gives rise to some other issues that have yet to be resolved. So with this in mind and until there is enough independent research, in my opinion, organic may have a slight positive edge on pesticide and environmental issues.  However, the important thing is to not fear fruits and vegetables but include them abundantly in your diet whether they are grown conventionally or organically. Both are a nutritious boost for your health.

However, It is blatantly apparent that there are many diverse opinions of the American grower and consumer on this highly controversial topic. Another important factor is often the higher cost of organically grown foods but based on all the facts, the choice is up to you.

CLICK HERE.

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Fruits and Vegetables: Conventional or Organic?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in the day of my graduate years, the main topic for my dissertation research project was to investigate what if any differences occurred in breast cancer rates in female rats when given diets containing either omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids. Spoiler: we found no significant differences in breast tumor incidence between our four groups of rats. So we repeated the study and still found no difference. Needless to say, it was a disappointment since every graduate student is sure they will inadvertently discover the cure for some disease and of course cancer was the big prize. No Nobel Prize here in other words.

Since then, diet and cancer research has progressed from dietary fats to the idea that diet and cancer associations involved the newly discovered phytochemicals found in fruits and vegetables that have the potential for cancer prevention.  The study found HERE was  observational (no cause and effect). However the study was huge and lasted for 32 years.

Some fear has been generated that conventional produce is not safe to eat due to the presence of harmful pesticides. It is important to know that all produce  may have some pesticide residues and that organic crops may use less or less toxic pest control methods.  Bottom Line: Enjoy eating more of any kind of produce  – conventional or organic.  Both have very similar nutritive values and health benefits. It’s your personal choice but we need to know the facts and not avoid fruits and vegetables due to pesticide fears.

CLICK HERE.

 


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Pesticides and Fertility

 

Strawberries provide lots of good nutrition and can be cancer fighters.

Pesticide residues may not be that important for everyone; however, women who are trying to become pregnant may want to be careful when choosing fresh fruits and vegetables. Also, some recent reports have found that pesticides may also adversely  affect the brains of growing fetuses and young children.

You may want to choose organic versions of some of the most contaminated. Organic produce may still contain some pesticide residues but would certainly be better choices under  these circumstances. In these cases, you may want to consult the list of the “dirty dozen” put out by the Environmental Working Group.

CLICK HERE.


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Pesticide Residue Free? About 50%

  1. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the FDA and the USDA share the responsibility for limiting exposure to pesticides in the food supply. The EPA sets tolerances while the FDA and USDA monitor pesticide residues in both domestic and imported foods. In general, the amounts of pesticides we are exposed to through foods are very small. The USDA’ s Pesticide Data Program has found no more than 1% of samples with residues above established EPA tolerances. Since the dose matters, repeated consumption of any one pesticide could be harmful; this is unlikely since most people consume a variety of foods produced using many different pesticides. Newer pesticides are less toxic and more effective in smaller doses than many of the older  ones. New methods of controlling pests involve the use more natural occurring substances like microorganisms that control pests.  Smoler and Grosvenor, Nutrition: Science and Applications, Third Edition.

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Politics and Pesticides?

The politics of pesticides has been a controversial topic for decades. It is not only the bee population at risk, but now it looks like our children may be at risk, too.

This is one reason for sticking to organic as suggested by the Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen”. However, not all people can choose organic due to increased costs. Consequently, they may avoid choosing those fruits and vegetables entirely.

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The Real Side of Monsanto?

Monsanto is often accused of being a monster company when it comes to production of pesticides. The following articles tell both sides of the controversy surrounding this company. Interesting! What can we believe about their actual agenda?

CLICK HERE.

CLICK HERE.