FOOD, FACTS and FADS

Exploring the sense and nonsense of food and health


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The Best Diet? The Debate Continues

 

The debate about the best diet for health (not weight loss) continues with the latest report from U S. News and World Report. Winning top awards are three diets: the Mediterranean Diet, the DASH diet and coming in third, the Flexitarian Diet. These diets are basically saturated fat restricted and recommend the conventional wisdom of a more plant-based approach of whole grains and fruits and vegetables in order to prevent heart disease and diabetes.

On the other hand, there are critics of the report that include the proponents of the low carbohydrate, high fat ketogenic (LCHF-keto) diet that is lately gaining some attention at least for weight loss and claims to reverse diabetes. Many of these claims appear to be anecdotal on the Internet. By the way, the LCHF-keto diet came in last in the report by the nutrition experts. See my previous post HERE.

It still remains to be seen conclusively if  any of these diets can be protective against heart disease.  There is a great deal of research on the Mediterranean Diet and the lower risks of many chronic diseases.  To be fair, research on low carb diets is increasing due to interest on the LCHF diet claims for weight loss, diabetes prevention and lowering some risk factors of heart disease.  At the heart of the conflict is whether saturated fat is an unhealthy or healthy fat. The LCHF diet recommends using saturated fat liberally.

Partisans of both sides may be right or wrong. One fact is that  both are very restrictive and are very hard to follow for long periods of time, especially in our current food environment. There is fat and /or sugar (carbs) in almost every brand and type of processed food products. Often the food industry intentionally puts them there to increase the palatability of the product and to increase profits.

In the meantime,  the best diet remains to be the food choices you make and can incorporate into your lifestyle whether it is vegan, low fat or low carb.  One diet is not for everyone. It is important to consider your genetic background and health history. If you change your diet please consult with your physician for his/her opinions.

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Will America ever demand the McVegan burger?

 

And now, the McVegan Burger – if you live in Finland or Sweden.  McDonalds is again now taking a chance that the latest trend of plant-based foods is here to stay. Whether Americans will ever have the opportunity to try it remains to be determined.

For details, CLICK HERE.


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Vegans vs. Meat? Some myths exposed.

Interesting discussion about vegan versus meat diets. Some good points were made and references support most of them as far as I can tell. Try to find some common sense on both sides of the debate. When the “facts” are known it becomes easier to decide your own personal diet choices and what is best for you. There is no one diet that fits all.

CLICK HERE.


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The Sensible Approach to Healthy Diets?

farmersmarketsign_tnAre you tired of being told to eat a plant-based diet? Do you find that conversion to a vegan diet impossible?  Did your doctor suggest you follow a healthy diet? Think about trying the approach of becoming a Flexitarian.  It can put you in control of your diet and at the same time start to incorporate a sensible approach to dietary health and still enjoy a moderate amount of meat, poultry, or fish without guilt.

CLICK HERE


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A Seagan Diet?

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Want to go vegan? Barring any ethical concerns, this diet may make it easier (if you like fish.) Another way to a more plant-based diet is to get the book: The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease, and Add Years to Your Life by Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, LDN.